Starting A Cult Of Improvement And Success With Braxton Amundson

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AL Braxton | Starting A Cult

 

It’s only common for people to associate cults with a stigma considering its history of brainwash violence. However, Braxton Amundson, realized how a cult could be used for success in the modern age. Braxton is the author of Let’s Start A Cult: The Power of Radical Belief. He gives his insight on how cults apply to the current society and why it’s currently a good thing. Having experienced grief, Braxton shares the lessons he learned and his realizations on how to heal a broken heart. In this episode, learn how improving yourself and committing to it can spark a chain to make the world a better place.

Listen to the podcast here:

Starting A Cult Of Improvement And Success With Braxton Amundson

Welcome, Braxton Amundson, author of Let’s Start a Cult: The Power of Radical Belief. Braxton, it’s good to have you here.

It’s amazing to be here.

This is awesome. We’re going to jump to the cult. What are you talking about? Are you trying to scare people? Are you trying to scare your readers away? Are you trying to evoke or provoke them?

I’ve been involved in a lot of personal development stuff for a few years and it started when I went to sell children’s books door-to-door in Oklahoma when I was in my junior year of college. People were like, “It sounds like you’re in a pyramid scheme.” I looked it up online and it’s like, “The dangers of the southwestern advantage cult.” I went and did it and it changed my life. It was the first experience that I had about getting out of my comfort zone and being comfortable with the uncomfortable. It’s a bit building a business so I’m recruiting people to join my business and people kept saying, “It sounds like you joined a cult.” Over the years, I learned to embrace it. “It sounds like you joined a cult.” I did. I’m in a culture full of people who are committed to working their hardest and stretching out of their comfort zone so that we can be the best versions of ourselves.

Is that your definition of a cult?

A culture of people who are committed to breaking out of their comfort zones and being uncomfortable to become the best version of themselves. You can call anything a cult. We’re born into a cult. Life is a cult. If you’re a sports fan and I’m a Steelers fan, I’m part of the Steelers cult. That’s a culture of beer-drinking football fans that wave towels around. Anything can be called a cult. When I say, “Let’s start a cult.” If everything is a cult, let’s start our own. Let’s start one that’s founded on empowerment, integrity, principle, and on being uncomfortable being the best versions of ourselves. If we’re going to, by default, be part of a cult, why not be part of something that’s going to make us better?

The word cult can be scary for people because they think about brainwashing. They think like down in South America, the Kool-Aid, and people committing suicide as a collective. There are all these images of a cult, especially stuff that maybe has money involved. You’re saying, “Let’s redefine and reframe what cult is?”

Yeah. Go ahead and tell me that I’m brainwashed.

Are you brainwashed?

I am brainwashed. I’ve been washing my clothes in my car for several years. I started washing my brain and I’ve been thinking more clearly than ever.

Anything I say, you’ll have a spin on it.

I’ll tell you that it’s true.

You can call anything a cult. We're born into a cult. Life is a cult. Click To Tweet

You’re in a multi-level marketing company and a lot of people think that’s a cult. Speak into that.

Tell me that I’m in a pyramid scheme.

Are you in a pyramid scheme?

I am and I’m trying to get to the top.

Why did you write this book?

When I was a kid, I used to invite my friends when I was in third grade. My friends used to come over and we’d go swimming. While we’re swimming, my mom would start to pour us Kool-Aid. We’d take a break from the pool, she’d serve us Kool-Aid, and we’d happily drink it. Over the years, I started drinking different kinds of Kool-Aid, but at some point along the line, we stopped trusting the Kool-Aid that our friends were serving. That’s a metaphor. My mom would pour me Kool-Aid and I wouldn’t think anything about it. “Drink the Kool-Aid.” “Okay, mom. I trust you. I trust that you poured me Kool-Aid that’s going to refresh me and hydrate me so I get back to playing.” When I come up to my friends and family, I say, “I joined this culture. I started changing my life for the better. I started achieving some things that I’ve never before believed possible and what’s possible for you if you get out of your own way. I’m not drinking that Kool-Aid.” “When I was five years old, when I poured Kool-Aid and gave it to you, you drank it.” At what point did we stop trusting our friends and family?

Are you saying that it’s when you start losing trust and then you’re becoming suspect of like, “What are they doing over there?” There’s some suspect. It’s almost like all those people who are drinking the Kool-Aid, they’re having too much fun and life is not supposed to be fun. Even the concept is like, “What Kool-Aid are you drinking?” “They’re drinking Kool-Aid.” Isn’t there a saying like that? My cousins used to say, “What Kool-Aid are you drinking?” “I’ve been there, done that, and drank the Kool-Aid.”

Have you seen The Lego Movie 2? It’s like Airplane II: The Sequel. What happens is all the other Lego Movie characters from the first movie start getting attacked by these little heart ponies. They’re throwing little hearts at them and they kidnapped all of Emmet’s friends. He’s trying to save them, he goes and finds them, and they’re all brainwashed. It looks like they’re completely brainwashed out of their mind like love drunk and he’s trying to rescue them. They’re like, “No, we’re like completely fine,” and he runs into his alter ego and his alter ego is this cool guy, badass, and too cool for school. As the movie goes on, he’s trying to rescue his buddies from all the bad guys that brainwashed them. It turns out that they’re living a better life. It turns out the real bad guy was the cool guy that he was following until he became brainwashed too. They’re like, “Seriously, we like it here. We’re doing better.” They all got married.

What people experience as, “You’re brainwashed.” Since when did washing something become a bad thing? It’s like, “If I’m going to wash my brain, it gets to be from someone I truly trust.” The negative context with brainwashing comes from manipulation when there’s self-interest at heart. That’s what I say to my friends. I’m captaining LP 167 for MITT, which is Mastery in Transformational Training. There are some people who are like, “It’s a program that’s made for you to challenge your beliefs.” There’s a lot of breakdown going on and there’s a lot of all this stuff happening. People question my motives and I’m like, “You’ve seen her before. I have no idea why someone would go through four months of being a punching bag for the student.” They’re nerds and I’m like, “What purpose do I have to stand here and be someone’s punching bag? There’s no possible motive that I could have.”

I want to explain to the people out there who don’t know MITT, Mastery in Transformational Training. It’s an emotional leadership training program and it is set in terms of enrollment. You enroll people in and the students enroll people in. The power of enrollment, which is talked about in your book, is being able to evoke, encourage, invite and take a stand for people. That could be challenging for people. It’s like, “No, I don’t want to go,” and not being attached. It’s being an invitation and that’s the thing because we came up with the power of radical belief. When someone truly believes in something, people are either going to want to come along for the ride or they’re going to reject it totally. Either way, you’re being fine with it and being unattached. I’ve experienced it. I was enrolled by someone who did it, Lewis Howes. It was such a powerful tool for me. It’s changed my life and some people don’t want to change. What are your thoughts there?

I got Disney+ and it’s awesome. If you don’t have Disney+, here’s a plug for that. I grew up on the Disney Channel. I was watching movies like Johnny Tsunami and you probably don’t remember any of these.

AL Braxton | Starting A Cult

Starting A Cult: A cult is a culture of people who are committed to breaking out of their comfort zones and being uncomfortable to become the best version of themselves.

 

I have an eighteen-year-old so I’m in High School Musical age.

Disney Channel Original Movies were effectively like Hallmark Movies for kids so I’m tacking and watching all of them. I watch this movie called Luck of the Irish and what happens is his gold necklace gets stolen by somebody. This guy is trying to steal all the luck from all the leprechauns. If he steals gold pieces from their family, he can have all the luck in the world so he steals his necklace. He used to be this lucky guy. The scene starts out that he’s a basketball player and the ball started to go out of bounds. He goes to save the ball from going out of bounds and it goes in the hoop, like absurd luck. All of a sudden, things start going haywire in his family. All of his luck turned to crap. His mom starts getting shorter until she’s a foot tall. He starts getting shorter and he runs into his grandpa. He’s like, “If all the people are getting shorter and changing because we lost our luck, why haven’t you changed?” He goes, “It’s not easy for an old man to change.”

I was thinking about that for a minute. They’re stuck. The older you are, the more stuck you are in your patterns and it isn’t easy for an old dog to learn new tricks. It’s not easy for an old person to change. When people get stuck in their ways, that change is uncomfortable. It’s hard and challenging. It takes feedback, practice, and failing over and over. I went to this transformational comedy show and there’s a guy named Ross Everett. His character’s name was Dale Thorhammer. That was the transformational coach for the developmentally challenged. It was hilarious. If you haven’t seen the show, it’s amazing. He’s like, “I’ll tell you why. I’m a master at doing things that seem impossible. There’s a point in my life where I wasn’t able to walk. I’m not lying and I’m not exaggerating. I was looking around and I started getting mad at all the people for walking around. One day, I decided to make a change. I stood up and I took a step. Do you know what happened? I fell down. I kept trying it every single day. I stand up and I take another step, and then I’d fall down. I kept at it until one day I took a step and then I took another step, and I’ve been walking ever since.”

If a 1.5-year-old Dale Thorhammer could stand up and walk, then so can you. Think about babies. They’re not afraid to stand up and fail. They’re not afraid to take those steps, but somehow we as adults, we’re afraid to try something new and fail. Think about it like it’s funny and it’s comical, but the point is real. The baby does not think about standing up and falling down. “I fell down. I’m never going to do this again.” Unfortunately, the drift is full of people that make your fall even harder. It’s like kick him while he’s down. You stand up, take a step and fall.

People love that. Do you notice that? Especially if you’re doing work and people know that you’re improving yourself. Maybe you were an alcoholic, you’re AA, and you’re doing well, and then something happens and you pick up the bottle again, “It didn’t work.”

We do that to ourselves more than anyone else. I’ve been coaching people on breaking addictions because I’m someone that broke through a lot of addictions in the past couple of years. I used to eat unhealthily and I even put it in my book. I’m like, “I used to look like a guy that ate a bunch of chicken with chicken wings and cheeseburgers and worked out because I was a guy that ate a bunch of chicken wings and cheeseburgers and worked out.” I was trying to look different, but I wasn’t willing to change anything. I was like, “Why don’t I look like that vegan guy that stretches and does yoga?” I used to eat chicken wings, cheeseburgers and lift weights. Why would I look any different? I decided one day, “I’m going to change my patterns,” and it was hard for me to revert back into cutting out. I initially cut out red meat then I cut out the chicken. I started cutting things out until I became completely vegan and started living a healthier lifestyle.

Are you a vegan now?

I am. When I was going on this journey and I cut out red meat, and I finally craved and ate a cheeseburger, I used to go into self-beat up. I’m like, “I can’t believe I did this. I break myself.”

We find evidence of our limiting beliefs. “I’m not good enough. You failed.”

What I started to do is started to recognize, “Braxton, you went three months without having red meat. How cool is that?” If you went for three months, you could go another six. Instead of focusing on the breakdown, I acknowledged what I did create. I did the same thing with porn. I’m like, “I’m never watching porn again.” I went for six months. It’s one of the hardest things that break through.

I want to acknowledge you for sharing that in public space because that’s the thing about shame. We get to shine the light on it, not even that because you’re not ashamed. You’re fully being vulnerable and transparent, and we get to shine the light on it. It gives other people permission to tell their truth.

The negative context with brainwashing comes from manipulation when there's self-interest at heart. Click To Tweet

I say this out in the open and I used to be like, “I’m such a gross, disgusting person because I watch porn.” I used to think that about myself and I happened to be talking about it. 95% to 100% of people maybe or it’s a lot more than you think, it taboos the people that don’t talk about it. Talking about it is the first step. Once I acknowledge like, “Let me tell my friends I’ve been struggling a lot with porn. It’s been taking away the intimacy in my relationship.” I share that with my friend and he goes, “I watch porn, too, but I didn’t realize how it was destroying my life.” I’m like, “I’m working through this and the more people that I tell, the more accountability partners that I create.” I finally go, “I’m not going to watch porn ever again.” I go for six months, and then something happens.

It was after my sister-in-law died. My unhealthy coping mechanisms went back and I went back to eating and porn. Heartbreak took over and I’m trying to fill this void with anything that I possibly can to avoid reality because those are great reality escapes. At that moment, I’m like, “I haven’t watched porn in nine months.” All of a sudden, I binge on it, on food, on meat, and all the unhealthy habits. I noticed my stuff is starting to go into self-beat up and I go, “Braxton, remember what you wrote. I get to be a person that does the things that I talk about. I get to be a person that practices what I preach. There might be a breakdown and it’s okay to have a breakdown. Breakdowns happen, but I don’t get to beat myself up for it.”

I stopped and I said, “No, you’re going to celebrate the last nine months instead of breaking down for the last day.” That’s a lot more powerful like, “Braxton, great work. You broke through one of the most addictive substances in the entire world.” I’m like, “Let’s celebrate that.” I started celebrating that and then once I did that, my heart started to heal because it’s like, “My heart is open. I’m heartbroken. I’m doing whatever I can to close off and avoid.” The more I close off and avoid, the emptier I feel inside because the only way to heal my broken heart is to open it back up.

Yes, to others. Where a lot of people feel shame, that’s when they separate from others and it’s what you did. You changed, you opened up to a friend, and you gave him permission to open up to you as well. There’s a community and when there’s a community, there’s a spirit and a higher being. It’s where it becomes a spiritual opportunity evolution. God said, “Wherever 2 or 3 people meet, I am there.” That’s biblical. That’s what happens when we’re alone in shame and in separation. That’s when it perpetuates a lot.

The night before my sister-in-law died, I wrote in my book, “Every interaction is both a blessing and a gift. Sometimes the greatest gifts in life are the hardest ones to receive because they come buried under the deepest amounts of pain.” I wrote that literally the night before she passed and I was like, “Holy crap.” My dad calls me and I’m like, “This is awful, Braxton. You wrote this last night.” I kept reading it like, “You wrote these words for a reason. Keep reading it.” Two days before that, some girl broke up with me. I wasn’t dating her for long, but I was a senior and I was interested. She broke up with me for someone else. I’m going through this heartbreak then I’m going through this heartbreak and I’m like, “I feel like Job from the Bible. I lost all this stuff that I once thought was amazing.”

I quote the Bible a lot in my book. I wouldn’t necessarily call myself a Christian author. If I am, I’m an edgy Christian author. I said, “No, Braxton. Every interaction is both a blessing and a gift. Sometimes, the greatest gifts in life are the hardest ones to receive because they come buried under the deepest amounts of pain. Braxton, continue to open your heart, continue to stand in your beliefs, and do all this stuff. I’m going to get through this.” I continued keeping my heart up and it was hard. I went on the third weekend for my PhD. I had a training weekend and it was the hardest thing I had to do, listening to people talking about choosing life and going out and saving people. I’m like, “This couldn’t be a worse time for me to hear it.” That’s my mindset and I go, “Could this be the best time for me here?”

My mind will tell me one thing and I redirect it because it’s all mindset stuff. What can I redirect to think differently? This is the best time for me to hear this. The next week was Basic 167 that I was the captain of and I was leading. I’m like, “Braxton, I don’t know what’s here but there’s something amazing coming to me.” When this happens, it’s preparing me for something that I wouldn’t be capable of receiving if I didn’t go through these trials and tribulations. It could be here right in front of me but if I didn’t do the work, I would never have it because I wouldn’t be able to appreciate it. I’m like, “Braxton, you’ve been doing a lot of work. You’re about to have one of the greatest gifts in the entire world.”

I go and speak at Miracle Tuesday, which is a ceremony that’s put on by the leadership training MITT that I do where they welcome in the coaches. It’s an opportunity for the community to pour their hearts and love to the people that are going to be coaching the next group at group leaders. I was the captain of this team so they called me into the circle to speak. This wound is fresh and it’s still bleeding. I poured my entire heart out and I was crying the whole time. I’m like, “The reason why I do this work, why I do what I do, why I wrote this book, and why I do everything that I possibly can to share my message is because I firmly believe when people understand my message, people won’t kill themselves. People won’t fight. People won’t quarrel. Relationships will be healthy and people will feel loved, cared for and connected.” Do you know John Hinckley Jr.?

I’ve heard of him.

He is the man that shot President Reagan. When they took him to jail, they took his diary and the police was flipping through his diary to find evidence. Is Gerald Ford the president before Reagan?

Yeah.

AL Braxton | Starting A Cult

Starting A Cult: The more you close off and avoid, the emptier you feel inside because the only way to heal a broken heart is to open it back up.

 

It’s Gerald Ford, and I could be incorrect if you’re researching this. Know that I’m not perfect in my history. It’s a president and I’m sure it’s Gerald Ford. He was going to murder Gerald Ford. He had a gun in his coat pocket and he was walking up to Gerald Ford at this rally. He was going to kill him and as he went to pull out his gun, this older lady bumps in the arm and she looked at his arm and she looks at him. She goes, “I’m sorry there, young man. I didn’t see you.” She puts her hand on him, “You have a great day. I’m sorry for your trouble.” He puts his gun away and doesn’t kill for it because that amount of love and connection is all he needed to stop the violence.

Two years later, he’s going to stand on top of this bridge with an assault rifle and start shooting people until he gets arrested. He goes into McDonald’s to order a Happy Meal that was going to be his last meal before he went and blast the people. He drives up on the bridge, parks his car, and eats his Happy Meal. As he walks out, he goes to the back of the car and opens up his trunk to get the assault rifle. Someone drives by and she goes, “I remember you. You ordered that Happy Meal. I hope you enjoyed it,” and drove away. He closes his trunk, gets in his car and drives away. That amount of love and connection is all the man needed to stop the violence. This man was far removed from that love and connection that he went out and shot President Reagan.

I shared this on Miracle Tuesdays. I said, “I’m doing this work. My vision is that people continue to open their hearts to each other no matter how much quarrel, walls, divisiveness and pushing people away, and no matter how many people say, ‘I joined a cult,’ or how many people say this or say that. I’m willing to keep going because the world matters that much. It doesn’t matter who’s thrown fist at me and who’s fighting me. I will continue standing for people in their greatness because that’s what heals the world. There was someone out there in my life and she’s not around anymore because she didn’t feel like she mattered. She clearly mattered but she didn’t know how to understand and recognize love. That’s the work that I’m doing. I’m continuing coaching me, Brax, and there’s something beautiful available, Brax. There’s something beautiful available for you. Trust it, promise, and keep going.”

I’m standing there and after we did this, they circled us up and we held hands. People started whispering in our ear of acknowledgments to fill us up to go and have a completely full cup to pour back into this team. A couple of people were whispering in my ear and I knew the first three. There are some friends of mine, then this voice whispers in my ear and she’s like, “I was touched by everything that you said. I’m moved by it. I know your eyes are closed and you can’t see me. We’ve never met before, but I promise you, I’ll find you again.” Five days later, I met her and she’s now my girlfriend. That’s how I met her.

They’re always like, “When did you guys meet?” She’s like, “I met him this day but he didn’t meet me until five days later.” Years ago, she broke up with her ex-boyfriend and he killed himself. The words that I shared on that Miracle Tuesday softened her heart and she was not open to receiving love for long because she was hurt by the last love that she had. She’s like, “I have no idea but I’m moved by everything you say.” She wrote me a song on my birthday and it’s called Miracles on Tuesday. You asked me how I met my girlfriend and that’s how it was.

It’s this whole process of writing this book. What happened? When your sister-in-law did take her life, you were in the process of writing this book. We were working together and then that passage you wrote the night before took a turn. We’re fully tested in life. We’re spiritually tested when the rubber hits the road. We can write all these niceties like, “Be kind to one another, meditate, brush your teeth, and all of these things,” but it’s not until you are tested that sometimes you truly learn the lessons. This process of sharing your truth at that moment, that tragedy, waking up something in your now girlfriend and creating that deeper connection that wasn’t based on being at the bar or the club. It was like, “What did your soul speak?”

I now have a deep appreciation for life, not just my life but for your life and for every single person’s life because I don’t know when my time is going to be up. I’m willing to put myself out there. Someone asked me on MLK Day and I didn’t realize that I was this huge Martin Luther King fan and that people know me as this huge. I quote him a lot. I like quoting powerful people.

He’s in the book, isn’t he?

Probably.

He started a cult.

He absolutely did.

In your definition of it.

Continue standing for people in their greatness because that's what heals the world. Click To Tweet

“Who are the four people you’re most inspired by, Braxton?” I said, “Jesus Christ, Martin Luther King, Bob Marley and Jackie Robinson.” They asked why and I said, “All four of those people were willing to die for what they believed and they were willing to die.” Jackie Robinson wasn’t killed for his beliefs, but there were angry mobs that showed up to his house threatening to kill his family because he wanted to play baseball. It’s not about playing baseball. It’s about civil rights. If it was about playing baseball, he would have quit after the first pitch. It’s like, “What’s your vision for this world?”

My mom is in this book a lot. Sometimes, I feel maybe I was a little too mean. My mom’s a character in my story. She’s like this typical Christian woman from the country and she was in the basics that I captained. I was her coach. She joined MITT and I was her coach. I went to their group meetings and I wasn’t her group leader, but I was her coach. I’m like, “Mom, what’s your vision?” She’s like, “I want everyone to know Jesus.” I’m like, “What does that mean?” “It means that he is Lord.” I’m like, “You want people walking around this planet, telling each other that Jesus is Lord.” That means absolutely nothing. I’m like, “What if I say that James is Lord, am I going to hell?” She said, “Yes.”

I said, “What does it mean that Jesus is Lord and He’s the son of God?” These are all surface-level answers. To me, belief in Jesus Christ means that there was a person that lived one day that knew His morals and was unwavering on His commitment to His morals. He never wavered. He was willing to believe that he could do anything and he did it as Jesus walks on water. We can all walk on water if we believe we can. He believed He could. Peter walked on water too, but then his beliefs wavered and he fell in. A belief in Jesus means that I have the capabilities within me because Jesus is a person like you and I. I have the capabilities within me to live my life unwavering to my set of beliefs, such that I can achieve what I was born to achieve.

A relationship with God to me means that no matter where I’m at in my journey, there’s always going to be someone looking after me, that is going to guide me to find peace no matter what. That’s what a belief in God means. I’m like, “What if I use the exact same story and instead of saying of God, I used Kevin and instead of Jesus, I used James? Does that mean I’m going to hell?” Is it more powerful for me to say, “James lived unwavering for his beliefs. He died on a cross?” Would people rather walk around the planet saying, “Jesus is Lord?”

It’s a surface way. What you shared was a deep, true to your belief personal relationship versus some topical brainwash way to say, “Jesus is Lord,” which can be the easy answer. What does it mean on a heart-based level versus this topical thing that you spout out? Is it make love, not war? What are we talking about the power of love?

That type of connection is why people stick around. Someone once said to me, “How can I support you in building whatever you’re here to build?” She is a fashion designer and she wanted to do fashion for Lady Gaga. She’s like, “You could introduce me to Lady Gaga.” I said, “I don’t know Lady Gaga but I can teach you to grow yourself and be with her in a way that when you do meet her, she’s going to want to stay. Lady Gaga meets probably dozens of fashion designers every single day. How are you going to stand yourself out?” I truly believe that. I’m like, “I don’t know all these people but I promise you when I do meet people, they’re powerful connections and people want to stick around me.” The last interview that I did was with a girl named Sarah Fontenot.

She’s got probably 80,000 followers on her Insta page. I bumped into her one time at an event and she’s beautiful. She’s one of the most gorgeous women I’ve ever met in my entire life. She goes up to one of my friends, Garrain Jones, and she introduced one of her friends. One of her friends wanted to get a picture with Garrain and she’s like, “My friend wants to get a picture with you. I want to introduce you.” He’s like, “Sure.” He’s one of the most photogenic people I know and I made a joke. I was like, “If I can get a picture of him, I want a picture with you.” This woman is gorgeous. It was a joke, but not at the same time and she’s like, “That’s fine.” I got a picture with her and then I hit it with some knowledge. I went straight to some real stuff and it went from being this ha-ha, funny surface level conversation to real.

I hit her up three months later and I said, “I wrote a book. I’m working on getting my content out there. Could I possibly get on your podcast?” She’s like, “Of course.” It went from this surface-level interaction to this deep connection that we talked for probably an hour or so. We connected super deep. I didn’t talk to her a whole lot since then but then when I asked, “I’d love to do this. I’d love to share my content.” She’s like, “Of course. You’re doing me as much of favor being on my page as I am for you, letting you use my platform.”

You’re bringing value, your story and your vulnerability.

I showed her and I had the courage to go deep with her the first time I met her. I said, “I can’t introduce you to Lady Gaga because I don’t know her, but what I can do is teach you how to be with people such that they’re going to want to stick around you.”

That’s a beautiful story. Thank you for that. The story of your mom and your girlfriend that you met that she whispered in your ear and was moved by your story. You have a relationship now because of it. What message do you want to leave your readers of Let’s Start a Cult?

AL Braxton | Starting A Cult

Starting A Cult: Sometimes the greatest gifts in life are the hardest ones to receive because they come buried under the deepest amounts of pain.

 

We attract who we are. Have you seen the movie A Beautiful Mind? The guy, his daughter and then one of the people, and imaginations in his head. I’m like, “What if this guy happened to find out that three people were imaginations?” I take it six billion times farther. Every single person in this entire world is something that I’ve called forth that I’ve manifested into my life like, “You are not real. He’s not real. No one watching this is real. How you respond to me is my feedback for what I’m calling forth in my life.” What if this is all made of imagination? If it’s made of imagination, I can call forth anything into my life and I can choose what I attract so I attract the best in life. There’s a quote in the Bible that says, “Now we see each other a reflection as if looking in the mirror.” Do you know where that verse is located?

No, I don’t. I’m not a biblical scholar.

It is located at the end of the love chapter. It talks about what love is.

What chapter is that?

It’s 1 Corinthians 13. It’s, “Love is patient. Love is kind.” In the end, it says, “Now we see each other in a reflection as if looking in the mirror.” If I’m coming from pure, unconditional, radical love, I will reflect back nothing in this world except the absolute beauty in life. When I look at the news and I see a terrorist bomb to train in Europe, I’m responsible for that. I’m responsible for everything that happens not just in my life but in the entire world. I made up and created everything in this entire world, me. This is my world and the world you made up and created me. I’m not even real. I’m a teacher that you called forth that you’re talking to in your reality. I made up everything in my entire world. I come from an absolute love and connection. Comparison is the killer of joy.

I don’t compare. I choose to live my best life and I cheer every single person on for living their best lives. When I come from that radical love, there’s no choice but people treating each other well. There’s no choice but an amazing human connection and I am not perfect by any means. I absolutely attract breakdown because from time to time, I go into my human tendencies and live my life out of integrity. I committed to a vegan diet and I ate a cheeseburger. It happens and I get to let that go and recommit. It’s not okay. I understand that people are dying because I’m eating a cheeseburger.

We have a show on that as well. We talk about veganism.

Not even about veganism. People are dying because I broke my word and then I put energy into it. People are killing each other because I ate a cheeseburger.

That breakdown in your life creates a breakdown.

I coach people on something as simple as being on time. People are killing each other because you can’t be late. How do I know this? We have a date at 6:00 PM. I’m saying, “We had an appointment at 6:00 PM. Let’s meet.” Someone showed up twenty minutes late. All of a sudden, I was excited about this date and ten minutes later, I’m irritated. Thirty minutes later, I’m heartbroken, and now, I’m angry and frustrated. I get angry at someone and I pop off on them then they pop off at someone. It creates a chain. It’s like, “Hurt people hurt people.” When I’m out of integrity, I’m killing people. If I break my word myself by eating a cheeseburger, I’m energetically in a lower state and I’m breaking my word with other people.

Hurt people hurt people. Healed people heal people. By being healed, spreading that vibration and being that in the world, we create more of that. Braxton, we could be going on and on with this. You have much wisdom to share. I want to acknowledge you for being here, for writing your book, and continuing this process of revealing what people get to know. We get to it and be in a conversation about it. Where can people find out more about you and purchase the book?

Follow me on Instagram @BraxxOnBraxx. I love people. I get many messages and I’ve gotten many pictures of people on Christmas opening up my book. I’m proud of that. People follow me on Instagram and they send me pictures. They’re like, “Will you send me your thoughts in your book on Instagram?” If you want to get a hold of me on Instagram, don’t email me. I’ll delete that and it will get spam. I’m good at checking my filtered DM because they show up differently. You can get my book on Amazon, Let’s Start a Cult. Type that in the Amazon search bar or you can follow me on Instagram and send me a message. I’ll send you a signed copy.

Braxton, thank you for being here and bringing your knowledge and your light.

It’s an honor to join. Thank you.

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